Former San Diego State wing Ché Evans Jr., who was touted as a 3-star prospect out of high school, announced that he will be transferring to UTEP via his Instagram page.

The Miners men's basketball squad adds quality depth to their bench with the 6-foot-6 wing joining the squad. The San Diego Union-Tribune reported of Evans' transfer intentions back on Nov. 18. Sources told 600 ESPN El Paso that Evans officially entered the transfer portal on Monday. Following the end of the semester, Evans plans to move to El Paso and he hopes to practice with the squad before the end of the year.

However, the biggest question will be his eligibility.

Since he didn't play this season for the Aztecs, Evans could be eligible to join the Miners as early as Jan. 4 to become a midseason transfer, sources tell 600 ESPN El Paso. If he plays for the Miners this spring, Evans will have three years of eligibility with the Miners beginning in the 2022-23 season. The NCAA Division I Board of Directors ratified the adoption of a measure that allows athletes in all sports to transfer once without sitting a season.

At San Diego State, the former 3-star prospect never found his spot off the bench and only appeared off the bench in 10 games for just 42 minutes. In high school, Evans was known as a knock-down 3-point shooter and a pure scorer.

The Baltimore, MD. product graduated from Neumann-Goretti High School. He was previously named among the class of 2020's top-50 small forwards by ESPN (No. 45), Rivals.com (No. 49) and 247 Sports (No. 38). An injury he suffered hurt some of his recruiting efforts, but Evans was sought after by the likes of Boise State and SDSU.

Here are some highlights of the wing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9evxlkCfnk

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